Review: Half a King by Joe Abercrombie

half-a-king-uk-mmpbHalf a King
(Shattered Sea #1)
Joe Abercrombie

Publisher: Harper Voyager
Publishing year:
2014
Pages: 376
ISBN: 9780007550227
Language: English
Genre: Fantasy
Rating: 3/5
This review was originally written for ToTen Magazine.

In a kingdom that values physical strength and skill in battle, the crippled Prince Yarvi is the royal family’s embarrassment. His maimed hand doesn’t allow him to hold a shield properly, much less avoid another beating on the training ground.  He was more than ready to renounce his right to the throne and spend his life as a minister, but when his father and older brother are murdered, Yarvi has no choice but to take the crown. His reign proves short-lived when he is betrayed by his family and left for dead. He survives only to be sold as a slave, manning the oars on a merchant ship with only a single good hand. He swears vengeance on those who wronged him, but that road isn’t without its hardships and sacrifices.

Half a King is part of a trilogy, but this novel stands well on its own. Though the novel hints at an underlying concern that might appear in the trilogy’s subsequent books, most issues are wrapped up in a neat little bow. That said, this is very much the story of an underdog. Despite the character’s flaws and his initial cowardice, you can’t help but root for the disadvantaged prince Yarvi as he attempts to survive and even navigate an unkind world. It’s satisfying to find that Yarvi manages to utilize his training and his wit to reach his goals. He really comes into his own and grows as a character, which is the best part of the book.

Interestingly, Yarvi’s growth makes him cunning and pragmatic. He screws people over. He lives in a hard world, so he consequently grows into a harder person because of his experiences and the goals that he wants to achieve. Having sworn an oath, Yarvi comes to realize that fulfilling it means making sacrifices to do what needs to be done – and despite the doubts he has, he pulls through. This makes his growth realistic and interesting, and though his actions are sometimes deplorable, you can understand where he’s coming from. Yarvi’s persona is complimented by the cast of secondary characters that he meets and who join his cause. Though they help and support him – most of them selflessly, as a result from surviving hardships together – Yarvi also manages to alienate some of them with his decisions. At the same time, however, these secondary characters are the novel’s main flaw; though they seem interesting enough, they do not appear as complex and well-developed as Yarvi which feels like a missed opportunity. The exception, Nothing, was an enigma throughout the story. Still, these secondary characters were instrumental to Yarvi’s growth and their interaction was entertaining enough.

The narrative itself is fast paced, action-packed, and contains some twists. However, people who are used to something like George Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire would not find the back-stabbing and cunning manipulations in Half a King as complex. The world building is also fairly sparse for a fantasy novel, but what’s there is sufficient enough to get a sense of the world Yarvi lives in – just don’t expect anything overly extensive. There is some gritty subject material, but with the underlying sense of hope it never becomes bleak. The prose was also enjoyable to read; detailed, but not long-winded.

Half a King is a good book if you’re looking for a fast paced fantasy novel that does not become overly complicated, but still contains some grittiness and great character development. If you’d rather have something more complex, however, you might want to look elsewhere.  As enjoyable as Half a King is, Yarvi himself is pretty much the only complex element in the book.

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